Umbrella_KeckMedicine
umbrella-logo
Keck Medicine of USC is the University of Southern California’s medical enterprise, one of only two university-owned academic medical centers in the Los Angeles area.
Contact us at (800) USC-CARE (800-872-2273)

Videos

Where Is the Best Place of Treatment For an Acoustic Neuroma?

John Oghalai, MD, chair and professor of otolaryngology – head and neck surgery at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, talks about what questions patients should ask when looking for an acoustic neuroma surgeon.

Will I Lose My Hearing If I Don’t Have Surgery?

John Oghalai, MD, chair and professor of otolaryngology – head and neck surgery at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, talks about whether patients are at risk for hearing loss if they don't treat their acoustic neuroma.

When Can I Resume Normal Activities After Surgery?

How long does recovery take after acoustic neuroma surgery? John Oghalai, MD, chair and professor of otolaryngology – head and neck surgery at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, answers.

What Is an Acoustic Neuroma?

Acoustic neuroma, the second most common tumor in the brain, is a benign tumor of the vestibular nerve. John Oghalai, MD, chair and professor of otolaryngology – head and neck surgery at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, explains.

What Are the Symptoms of an Acoustic Neuroma?

Hearing loss. Ringing in the ear. Disequilibrium. John Oghalai, MD, chair and professor of otolaryngology – head and neck surgery at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, talks about the symptoms of an acoustic neuroma.

Who Is at Risk For an Acoustic Neuroma?

From children to older adults, people of all ages can develop an acoustic neuroma. John Oghalai, MD, chair and professor of otolaryngology – head and neck surgery at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, explains.

Do Acoustic Neuromas Affect People of All Ages?

From children to older adults, John Oghalai, MD, chair and professor of otolaryngology – head and neck surgery at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, talks about who is most likely to develop an acoustic neuroma.

Are Acoustic Neuromas Hereditary?

John Oghalai, MD, chair and professor of otolaryngology – head and neck surgery at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, discusses hereditary and nonhereditary forms of acoustic neuroma.

Are Acoustic Neuromas Cancer?

Acoustic neuromas, or vestibular schwannomas, are benign tumors made up of cells called Schwann cells. John Oghalai, MD, chair and professor of otolaryngology – head and neck surgery at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, discusses how acoustic neuromas grow.

How Fast Do Acoustic Neuromas Grow?

From 1 mm per year to not at all, acoustic neuromas typically grow at a very slow rate. John Oghalai, MD, chair and professor of otolaryngology – head and neck surgery at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, explains.